Changes in skin flavanol composition as a response to ozone-induced stress during postharvest dehydration of red wine grapes with different phenolic profiles

Journal article published in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Abstract: In this study, the combined effect of partial postharvest dehydration and long-term ozone treatment was evaluated at 10 and 20% weight loss as a strategy to induce compositional changes in grape skin flavanols. Two separate trials were carried out in thermohygrometric-controlled chambers at 20…

Journal article published in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, volume 68, pp. 13439–13449.

Authors: , , , , , and .

Abstract

In this study, the combined effect of partial postharvest dehydration and long-term ozone treatment was evaluated at 10 and 20% weight loss as a strategy to induce compositional changes in grape skin flavanols. Two separate trials were carried out in thermohygrometric-controlled chambers at 20 °C and 70% relative humidity. The first trial was conducted under an ozone-enriched atmosphere at 30 μL/L, whereas the second trial was performed under an air atmosphere as a control. Two red wine grape varieties were studied, Barbera and Nebbiolo (Vitis vinifera L.), for their different phenolic composition. Berry skin flavanol composition was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography after phloroglucinolysis and size-exclusion chromatography. The results showed that dehydration and ozone effects were variety-dependent. In Barbera skins, being characterized by lower proanthocyanidin contents, the two effects were significant and their combination showed interesting advantages related to lower proanthocyanidin loss as well as higher prodelphinidin and lower galloylation percentages. In Nebbiolo, skin flavanol composition was barely affected.

Key words: dehydration process; flavanols; ozone exposure; postharvest treatments; red wine grapes

BibTeX entry: click to show

@article{
	2318_1768921,
	url = {https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1768921},
	author = {Río Segade, Susana and Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén and Paissoni, Maria Alessandra and Giacosa, Simone and Gerbi, Vincenzo and Rolle, Luca and Gómez-Plaza, Encarna},
	title = {Changes in skin flavanol composition as a response to ozone-induced stress during postharvest dehydration of red wine grapes with different phenolic profiles},
	year = {2020},
	journal = {Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry},
	volume = {68},
	abstract = {In this study, the combined effect of partial postharvest dehydration and long-term ozone treatment was evaluated at 10 and 20\% weight loss as a strategy to induce compositional changes in grape skin flavanols. Two separate trials were carried out in thermohygrometric-controlled chambers at 20 °C and 70\% relative humidity. The first trial was conducted under an ozone-enriched atmosphere at 30 μL/L, whereas the second trial was performed under an air atmosphere as a control. Two red wine grape varieties were studied, Barbera and Nebbiolo (Vitis vinifera L.), for their different phenolic composition. Berry skin flavanol composition was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography after phloroglucinolysis and size-exclusion chromatography. The results showed that dehydration and ozone effects were variety-dependent. In Barbera skins, being characterized by lower proanthocyanidin contents, the two effects were significant and their combination showed interesting advantages related to lower proanthocyanidin loss as well as higher prodelphinidin and lower galloylation percentages. In Nebbiolo, skin flavanol composition was barely affected.},
	keywords = {dehydration process; flavanols; ozone exposure; postharvest treatments; red wine grapes},
	doi = {10.1021/acs.jafc.0c04081},
	pages = {13439--13449}
}

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